Lou von Salomé

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even as a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou) (via laurennmcc)

rispostesenzadomanda:

L’inverno del nostro scontento è quasi finito, possiamo procedere con la primavera del disappunto

Tempo, tempo, cos’è il tempo? In svizzera si fabbrica, in Francia è fermo, in Italia si spreca. In America dicono che è denaro, in India non esiste. Per me è solo una truffa…
Truman Capote (via kindlerya)
afterellen:

hurray!

afterellen:

hurray!

(Fonte: jockalot)

Felliniano. Avevo sempre sognato, da grande, di fare l’aggettivo
F. Fellini (via ilfascinodelvago)
-diagonalley:

miss-darling-clementine:

simplyalexandermason:

I feel like they just conspired together…

THE WINK, THE WINK IS KILLING ME.

This is so adorable!! 

-diagonalley:

miss-darling-clementine:

simplyalexandermason:

I feel like they just conspired together…

THE WINK, THE WINK IS KILLING ME.

This is so adorable!! 

artandsciencejournal:

Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”

Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.

Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.

If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.

-Anna Paluch

u-more:

Alla fiera dei leader.

u-more:

Alla fiera dei leader.

ftcreature:

The Featured Creature: Sea Sapphire: the Most Beautiful Animal You’ve Never Heard Of

This is the Sea Sapphire, an absolutely STUNNING marine copepod. Japanese fishermen would call a gathering of these creatures “tama-mizu”, or jeweled water.

Make sure to watch the VIDEO in the article!!

photos: Stefan Siebert, http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/bluemuseum, CIOERT, .gif from liquidguru vid